Posts Tagged ‘ Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure ’

Why You Should Bike to Work (and School)

bikebc

What’s your excuse NOT to bike to work or school? “It’s cold out.” “I’m tired.” “I don’t want to arrive all sweaty.” It’s easy to come up with excuses — until you’ve tried it — that is. That’s part of what Bike to Work & School Week, which runs annually the last week of May, is about — encouraging newbies to try commuting from a saddle while celebrating the benefits that can only be understood with experience. This year...

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Road Safety in Action at the Cloverdale Rodeo

You’re invited to have some serious fun with the Cone Zone BC work zone safety awareness campaign. Come on down to the Cloverdale Rodeo Go-Kart Experience, May 17-20, 2019. The Work Zone Safety Alliance is inviting kids ages 10 to 16 to learn about roadside safety while driving a Go Kart around a large circuit, complete with real world work zone hazards. In addition to the Go Kart circuit for children aged 10 to 16, there are electric three-wheel...

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How Hydrotechnical Engineers Keep Water Under the Bridge  

Simply put, a hydrotechnical engineer’s job is all just water under the bridge. British Columbia rivers are dynamic and powerful systems that move large amounts of water, sediment, woody debris and ice from our mountain tops all the way to the ocean. Along this journey, the waters encounter provincial highways and roads, and that’s where we come into the picture. We asked Hydrotechnical Engineer Dan Cossette about how he and his colleagues work to keep bridges, culverts and highways...

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What You Need to Know About Stricter Chain-Up Rules

Chain up configuration

We’ve introduced better chain-up regulations for commercial vehicles, which will provide more clarity for professional drivers this winter. That means safer roads, too. The changes come in the wake of one of our worst winters for highway closures. Unprepared commercial trucks caused 41 highway closures because they were either poorly equipped or totally unequipped with chains. In some cases, this was due to the driver’s inability to install the chains properly. Loss of traction in winter conditions leads to...

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See the Construction of the Fraser Canyon Highway in Historical Photos

History and infrastructure nerds rejoice! We’ve collected a stunning group of photographs documenting the construction of the Fraser Canyon Highway beginning in the 1920s, and moving into the 30s, 40s and 50s. We’re excited to share them with you here, along with a bit of Fraser Canyon route history to boot. Why all the Fuss about the Fraser Canyon? The Fraser Canyon was home to the first gold rush traffic in BC, which began in 1857 when gold was...

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What You Need to Know About Commercial Vehicle Safety Inspections

We sometimes get the question: what kinds of inspections do commercial vehicles have to go through to ensure they are operating safely? It’s a great question, especially since the way CVSE (Commercial Vehicle Safety and Enforcement) carries out inspections has evolved over the years. The most notable change is increasing mobile inspections and using technology to help focus inspections on commercial vehicles that need them. So, how does this play out? Then… Well, looking back 15 years, all commercial...

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Behind the Scenes on Upcoming Stickle Road Improvements

It’s a fact. BC is a heck of a popular place and our highways and byways are getting busier and busier. What should be a simple left turn can sometimes take a long, long time to make (not to mention big back-ups for folks in line behind.) We often need to make changes to some of those busier routes in order to keep travellers moving safely and smoothly, which is exactly what is happening on Highway 97 at Stickle...

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Adding Drains to the Floodplain to Keep Motorists Safe

At the March 2016 project open house, many local folks voiced concerns about the volume of water that sometimes saturates the area. When we tested different high water scenarios, using a hydraulic model, we recognized that the new section of road would actually need 11 large flood relief culverts, and the bridge would have to be five metres longer to accommodate the Tsolum River when things got extra wet.

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