Posts Tagged ‘ sea to sky highway ’

Bear Jams: What They Are and How to Avoid Them

wildlife program

  OK, choose your own adventure time… bear jams edition. Scenario: You and your kids are driving along one of BC’s picturesque highways (imagine the Sea to Sky, or Highway 4 to Vancouver Island’s west coast). All of a sudden, you notice a number of stopped vehicles ahead and people gathered around, their attention drawn to… what’s that?… a mother bear with her wee cub! Wow! Do you… A) Pull over slightly, tell the kids to sit put, and...

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Know When to Slow for Weather With Variable Speed Signs

If you are unable to view this video, click here to watch on our YouTube channel. We’re big fans of the maxim: “drive to conditions.” Highway travellers improve their safety dramatically by following those three words, especially in winter. Our highway engineers set speed limits based on IDEAL driving conditions – think bare, dry roads and warm, clear weather. Once factors mess with these conditions – be it fog, rain, snow… whatever – drivers should adjust by slowing to...

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Why Are Workers Doing the Safety Dance on the Sea-to-Sky?

No, the shoe-soaking shuffle displayed in the video above is not British Columbia’s answer to Gangnam Style. These moves make more sense. The crew is installing articulated matting where Charles Creek flows into Howe Sound as part of the final phase of erosion protection in the small community of Strachan Point, located between Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay. The project was completed in fall 2014, providing the final level of protection for a Sea to Sky Highway bridge, a...

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BC Highway Journeys for National Indigenous Peoples Day

Image courtesy Government of Canada In recognition of National Indigenous Peoples Day  on June 21, here are some tales of travel – from now and long ago. When present-day travellers take these routes, they experience First Nations culture along the way. Cross the Hagwilget Bridge over the BulkleyRiver to journey a historic trail used for hundreds of years by Indigenous traders. Passing over the modern bridge offers breathtaking views into the canyon far below. For the full experience, walk...

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