9 search results for "rockfall"

Innovative Rockfall Netting System Aims to Improve Safety at Three Valley Gap

About 20 kilometres west of Revelstoke lies a short stretch of BC Highway 1 with a unique geography. Running in-between Three Valley Lake and the Monashee Mountains, Three Valley Gap is, quite literally, located between a rock and hard place. In fact, next to the Kicking Horse Canyon, this may be the most technically challenging section of the Trans-Canada Highway, in the entire province. We love technical challenges, but not nearly as much as we love keeping the travelling...

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A Day in the Life of a District Manager

If you’ve ever reached out to your local Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure district office about an issue, there’s a good chance you’ve talked to one of our district managers. The District Manager, Transportation (also known as the DMT), is essentially the face of the ministry to the public. To organize service delivery, the province is divided into three regions, which are further divided into 11 highway districts. It looks something like this: South Coast Region   Southern Interior...

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How Survey Drones Make Transportation Better

When it comes to getting an accurate lay of the land, survey drones are indeed the “droids” we’re looking for. Also known as UAVs (or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles), drones are remote controlled flying devices equipped with cameras and various data collection capabilities. There are quad-copter drones (which move like helicopters) and fixed wing drones (which move like airplanes). Both of these make our work safer and more efficient, so it’s no surprise our engineering and field services departments are...

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What Happens After a Washout Hits a Highway

washout and recovery

Everybody loves spring. I mean, what’s not to like about balmy afternoons and BC in bloom? But as wonderful as spring can be, it also has a wild side (called freshet), as rapidly melting snowpack can oversaturate the ground supporting and surrounding roads, causing washouts. Washout damage often appears devastating – just look at the washout that closed Highway 33 south of Kelowna in April 2018 (above). It looked like it could take weeks to make it safe for...

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What’s the Difference Between TranBC and DriveBC on Twitter?

Han Solo and Chewbacca…  Batman and Robin… Robin Hood and Little John… A dynamic duo is usually two things: United by a common goal or cause Made up of two distinctive personalities We at TranBC and DriveBC are not heroes. Nay, we are but men and women from the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, united by the goal to give you the knowledge and tools you need to make informed decisions about travelling B.C. highways. Our approaches to tweeting...

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What Happens After a Rock Hits a BC Highway

Geo Assess Engineers

Rockfalls tend to happen more often in spring, when slopes above highways can be affected by changing temperatures and increased rainfall. The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s Rockwork Program uses a variety of techniques to keep rock and debris off highways. But rockfalls are a natural process and cannot always be prevented. In those cases, the ministry and its maintenance contractors spring into action to ensure the highway is cleared and safe for travellers. Reporting a Rockfall Maintenance Contractors...

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Emergency Signs on BC Highways and What they Mean

We have an extensive inventory of signs in use along our highways – many of which you are familiar with. But let’s take a minute to highlight some of our emergency signs – signs which you might not see very often (or which you might notice, but not be familiar with the significance of), that could indicate a potential emergency situation for you while driving. For example, Road Flooded, Washout and Forest Fire signs let you know exactly what...

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Ride, Don’t Landslide: Keeping Rock and Debris off BC Highways

British Columbia is home to some of the most picturesque landscapes in Canada. But with large amounts of precipitation, lush vegetation and mountainous terrain, it’s also one of the most landslide-prone. In fact, one of the country’s largest recorded landslides occurred east of Hope in 1965. The landslide resulted in about 47 million cubic metres of rock stretching across three kilometres of Crowsnest BC Highway 3 (imagine 18,000 Olympic size swimming pools filled with rock and you’ve got the...

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