Wildlife

Information on the work the BC Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure does to improve wildlife safety and mitigation on our highways.

4 Paths to Protecting Painted Turtles in the Creston Valley

Gravel and sand with a sunny southern exposure… If you were selling real estate to Western Painted Turtles ready to lay eggs, this would be a hot property. However, the saying about “location, location, location” holds true for turtles as well as humans. When a perfectly warmed gravel and sand pile is a road shoulder alongside a well-travelled route like West Creston Road, this is a risky nesting spot due to road maintenance work like shoulder grading. To protect...

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Why There’s Heavy Machinery in the Lougheed Hwy Wetlands

There’s a careful balance between making highways safer and preserving nature. When we widened Lougheed Highway 7 to four lanes between Nelson and Wren streets in Mission a few years ago, we had to sacrifice a portion of local fish habitat. But we also committed to help restore that habitat, which is important for salmon and other wildlife along the Stave and Fraser rivers. Phase 1 of the restoration was completed at the Silverdale Wetland last year. And if...

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How We Helped Protect 1000s of Years of BC History on Vancouver Island

Recently, along the shores of the Tseycum First Nation on Vancouver Island, we worked in partnership with the Tseycum people to prevent a portion of the Patricia Bay beach from eroding and washing out West Saanich Road. But it turned out that road restoration was only a piece of what we accomplished here. We also expanded wildlife and salmon habitat at Wsikem Creek, helped protect and monitor precious artifacts and ancestral remains as well as create lasting relationships along...

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Keeping Wildlife Moving Along the SFPR

As people drive the new South Fraser Perimeter Road (SFPR) from Surrey to Delta, a whole other world is unfolding around them. Creatures like otter, deer, mink, waterfowl, nesting birds, turtles and coyotes are going about their daily lives seeking food, raising their young and bedding down for some rest. That’s because when we developed the SFPR, to enhance mobility and safety for people, we worked hard to minimize disruptions for other living beings – like birds, wildlife and...

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Checking Culvert Choices for Highway Crossing Critters Near Nanaimo

If you were an amphibian or reptile, what kind of culvert would you choose to cross under the highway? For us, it’s an important question because the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure wants these critters to use culverts as tunnels, to move safely below highways. We really don’t want them risking their necks (though it’s difficult to identify the neck on a snake or frog) by crossing over pavement. So, we’re testing two kinds of culverts in the Nanaimo...

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Tell TranBC

What Do You Want to Know More About? Are you looking for something on TranBC but can’t find it? Or have a question about what the ministry does and why we do it? Share your question with us and we’ll try to get you an answer. Who knows – your question could be our next blog! Thank you – we couldn’t do this without YOU.

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Little Hands a Big Help in Habitat Restoration at Oliver Creek

Students of Palsson Elementary School in Lake Cowichan, BC, got together recently to plant native trees at Oliver Creek as part of a two-phase restoration project led by our Environmental Management group. The first phase included restoring fish passage through a culvert crossing on Youbou Road. The second phase, scheduled to happen later this year, will include correcting another culvert at Grosskleg Way in Lake Cowichan, and restoring a side channel downstream. We didn’t do it alone however, some...

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6 Ways We Help Fish Find Their Way Home

Green

Every summer, as you pack up your things and head out on the highways to your favorite BC destination, our ministry is busy working to improve fish passages and restore habitats along these same highways. Because spring and fall are the busiest times of year for fish spawning, and because high winter water levels and storms make work difficult, we work long hours during the summer to help restore mainly salmon and trout habitat that has been damaged from...

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