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2,741 comments on “Tell TranBC”

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  1. On roads in the interior of the province, I see road signs that are not mounted directly to their signposts, but instead are hung off a horizontal post. I rarely encounter such hanging road signs here on Vancouver Island. Why is this done in the Interior, but rarely encountered on the Island?

    Reply
    • Hi there David – great question. The signage is likely suspended due to the volume of snow which accumulates on the ground throughout the winter. Snow plows would quickly bury the signage, rendering them ineffective. Hope that this is helpful!

      Reply
  2. Hi,
    Since it’s construction several years ago the McTavish Exchange on Hwy. 17 (which serves the Victoria International Airport) has been very controversial for its use of several traffic circles.
    As a regular user of this exchange I am very curious about how accident rates at this location have changed since it’s opening.
    Can you provide me with this information or direct me to the appropriate source?
    Thank you.

    Reply
  3. With the start of construction of the Kicking Horse Canyon phase 4 upgrade to the Trans-Canada Highway, has any consideration been given to installing additional highway cameras to show its impact on traffic flow?

    Reply
  4. I have been insured and living in BC for 8 months now, and I have had two stone chips filled and now a giant crack in my windshield, not to mention stone chips all over my car. WHY does the MOT use gravel on the roads in the winter instead of beet juice or salt? Using gravel is just negligence. I look around Kamloops and on the highway and see broken windshields EVERYWHERE. Who can I contact about this? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Hi Mark – thanks for connecting with us here.

      Home owners can treat icy sidewalks with sand, but on a slippery highway, whipping winds and passing trucks can blow away light material within minutes.

      Instead, when there’s a need for extra traction, our maintenance contractors often rely on a carefully prepared mixture of gravel and crushed stone. The industry term for it is “winter abrasive.” The particles in this mix need to be heavy enough to stay on the road in a wind, large enough not to vanish under new snow or freezing rain, and yet small enough to keep the frustrating windshield chips and paint dings to a minimum.

      The right balance between too light and too heavy depends on the type of highway. On main provincial highways, no piece of winter abrasive is allowed to be over 9.5 mm in diameter. That’s smaller than a Cheerio. Very little of the mix is allowed to be even that big, with most of the material falling between 2.36 mm and 4.35 mm in size. (Less-travelled paved highways use a larger mix with a maximum diameter of 12.5 mm.)

      Our contractors filter their abrasive to make sure only particulate under 9.5 mm makes it into the hopper. Now, you may be saying, this is fine, but what about the time a whopper of a rock cracked my windshield? That was no Cheerio! This has happened to us too, and it can be annoyance or a shock. However, screened winter abrasives aren’t the only rocks on the road. Rocks get washed from the roadside onto the highway, fall from trucks, or get knocked onto the highway by wheels grazing unpaved shoulders.

      Your best protection is to keep your distance from other drivers, and if you do get a windshield chip, have it fixed right away. Claimants are responsible for taking steps to address their own damages, so please consider going through your own insurer to allow for repairs to be done immediately. Your insurer can then follow up on the claim on your behalf, and can include your deductible into the claim total.

      Please keep in mind, in order for a claim to be payable by the Province, there must be proof that there was negligence on the part of the ministry and/or highways contractor. If there was no negligence, the claim is not payable.

      Here is a link to more information on the claims process: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/transportation/driving-and-cycling/licensing-and-insurance/highway-claims

      We hope that this information is helpful.

      https://www.tranbc.ca/2011/02/17/winter-traction-why-small-rocks-instead-of-sand/

      Reply
  5. I live in the Boswer area of Vancouver Island, and my access to Highway 19 is at COOK Creek RD. I find the built in “delay” after arriving at the traffic light exceptionally long. I completely understand that at intersections, traffic must take turns so that flows are allowed to continue. I also understand that at major roadways, and during peak traffic flows, the secondary road users may have to wait longer to cross. What I’m having trouble understanding is, why is there a delay at all. It could have 20 minutes since the last vehicle has tripped the sensor, there could be zero traffic on Highway 19, it could be 11pm, and still, we have a long wait for the lights to change. Although I don’t expect anything to change, I would very much like to hear back from Engineering with an explanation as to the logic for the delays.
    Thanks
    Ron

    Reply
    • Good morning Ron – thanks for your comment. We have shared this comment forward with our staff for their review and will let you know what we hear back.

      Reply
    • That’s interesting Ron. I use the Horne Lake Exit and it seems to change regularly at much shorter wait times.

      Reply
  6. Is there not a law against using engine brakes in Richmond and Delta? Pretty much every night I hear truckers using them going Northbound in the Massey Tunnel on Hwy 99.

    Reply
    • Hello Danny – thanks for your question. We have sent your comment to our staff at the CVSE to determine if there are restrictions in place along this corridor. Stay tuned.

      Reply
    • Hi Danny – we sent your question to our folks in the CVSE and they advised that signage and enforcement of air brakes in this area is the responsibility of the local municipality. We hope that this is helpful. Thanks again for connecting with us here.

      Reply
  7. Whom do I contact to inform whomever is responsible for an obstruction(iceberg,snow and dirt compact.)on the highway that left damage to my vehicle and had fallen from a semi truck? This iceball was extremely large and solid.

    Reply
    • Hello Gordon – thank you for connecting with us here. Claimants are responsible for taking steps to address their own damages, so please consider going through your own insurer to allow for repairs to be done immediately. Your insurer can then follow up on the claim on your behalf, and can include your deductible into the claim total.

      Please keep in mind, in order for a claim to be payable by the Province, there must be proof that there was negligence on the part of the ministry and/or highways contractor.

      Here is a link to more information on the claims process: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/transportation/driving-and-cycling/licensing-and-insurance/highway-claims

      We hope that this information is helpful.

      Reply
  8. How do we have a “Speed limit is 50km/hr when children on highway” sign installed in our community? We have kids that must walk on the shoulder everyday on 19a. Its an 80km/hr stretch (already far too fast and we have had several fatalities), people are often travelling at 100km/hr.

    Reply
    • Hello Fiona,

      Thanks for your message. We encourage you to reach out directly to our staff in the Nanaimo area office to discuss your concerns further.

      Here’s the contact info:

      Vancouver Island District
      3rd floor – 2100 Labieux Rd.
      Nanaimo, BC V9T 6E9
      250-751-3246

      Reply
  9. How do I research the traffic light patterns data and decisions on Hwy 97, esp. West Kelowna?

    Would you be so kind as to inform me on the efforts being made towards Intelligent Traffic Systems in British Columbia.

    Reply
  10. My concern is regarding the northbound left turn lane at Nanaimo Parkway and JinglePot Road, at the southern intersection where these two roads meet. During busy times, the left turn lane has insufficient time to empty this lane even by half, and the overflow ends up stopped in one of the lanes of the two lane highway as traffic pours down the hill. People then try to turn right to make a u-turn and cross the intersection to avoid this left turn further adding to the danger, but you can hardly blame them for trying to avoid what is sometimes a 5 minute wait. A few seconds added to this left turn lane would help prevent these dangers. I’ve contacted the city of Nanaimo, but I believe it may be a TransCanada issue.

    Reply
  11. I just have a question regarding the rebate E bike program and if the government is considering any further rebates for regular E bikes over and above the scrap it program. Before the election there were some discussion that there would be new incentives for individuals looking to purchase E bikes.
    Regards

    Reply
  12. I am trying to report large rocks being ejected from dump truck tires on 100th and 140st in Surrey BC. The rocks weigh about 1 – 2 kilos and fly onto the sidewalk and grass areas. Anyone struck by these rocks will most likely be killed. I have taken pictures of the rocks. They have crews picking most rocks regularly so they know about the problem.

    Reply
    • Hello – if you see a concern with a commercial vehicle – please call or contact the CVSE directly. Their toll free 24 hour phone number for reporting violations is: 1-888-775-8785 and their email contact information can be found here: https://www.cvse.ca/

      Thank you!

      Reply
  13. I am wondering if there are any updates regarding the status of the Malahat Safety Improvements – Goldstream project? It would be nice to know where the project is now since the public engagement in September 2020. I am very eager to see this project move ahead and be constructed!

    Reply
  14. i have a safety concern in nanaimo, there is a railway bridge by the southgate mall and at night it is as dark as midnight in hell there, there is zero street lighting and i took it upon myself to try to widen the sidewalk by removing a lot of the built up dirt and debris and picking weeds and was able to widen the walkable area a few feet, cuz no one else seems to care, and i have made it a bit safer to walk on, however in the winter, the snow gets piled up on the sidewalk and it is so dangerous and slippery to walk on and there are no street lights and people are blinded by the lights of the cars and it is inevitable that someone will slip and get killed, maybe someone could come fix this problem before someone gets killed, and yes it is the only road to go down, there are no options
    on the other side of the highway the city of nanaimo came a few years ago and widened the sidewalk to make it safer but they didn’t put in street lights and it is a very dangerous place
    now we all remember what happened in stanley park and that person slipped and got killed in the traffic
    it would be great if this problem gets fixed before some one dies, all you have to do is widen the sidewalk and put in some street lights

    Reply
    • Hi there Torie – thanks for your comment. Sorry – we are unclear on exactly what is being asked and would like to help but need to identify the exact location you are referring to. Are you referring to a railway bridge path (sidewalk) or a path along the road near the railway bridge? It might be the responsibility of the rail company – but to be sure – we would need the exact location (GPS coordinates, address etc.) to look into it further. You can also contact our staff directly in the Nanaimo office with your concerns and further information. Here is their contact info:

      Vancouver Island District
      3rd floor – 2100 Labieux Rd.
      Nanaimo, BC V9T 6E9
      250-751-3246

      Hours of operation:
      8:30 am to 4:30 pm Monday to Friday

      Reply
  15. Who is responsible for the snow that accumulates on the new speed reduction signs on hwy 1 in the Fraser valley that dropped snow on my window- smashing it. I have asked this now for a second time and no response. Next I will ask my local news station

    Reply
    • Hello Lance,

      Thanks for your comment. We replied to your comment yesterday at 3:58 pm with the following.

      In reply to Lance Ediger.
      Hello Lance,

      Thank you for bringing this to our attention. This is the first we have heard of the issue and we have shared it forward with our staff for their review. Claimants are responsible for taking steps to address their own damages, so please consider going through your own insurer to allow for repairs to be done immediately. Your insurer can then follow up on the claim on your behalf, and can include your deductible into the claim total. Here is more information on the claims process: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/transportation/driving-and-cycling/licensing-and-insurance/highway-claims

      Is it possible that the email notification of our response went to your junk mail?

      Reply
  16. On Highway 1 Southbound near Westshore Pkwy, some minor work is being done resulting in a closed lane on weekdays and a 24/7 60 km/h construction speed limit. When work is happening with the lane closure, 60 km/h is totally reasonable. But during non-working hours when both lanes are open, 60 km/h seems too low. The reason for the 24/7 speed reduction seems to a removed section of barriers. But I question why it warrants a speed that is 30 km/h below the regular limit of 90 km/h. Would it be possible to have a construction speed limit of 60 km/h during working hours and 70
    km/h during non-working hours to make it more reasonable. As when work is not occurring, traffic is often doing 85-90 km/h, which makes travelling 60 km/h unsafe.

    Reply
  17. ETC highway #1 in Kamloops, east of Grand boulevard is not sanded often. I live in Dallas, commuting into the centre of town and on bad days it is awful, especially the ‘s’ curve just before Orchards Walk. I’ve found that once I cross that invisible barrier (Grand Boulevard) into town, my trip is a lot less slippery – there is actual evidence that city crews have been out and sanded. Not so for the Dallas and Campbell Creek portion of the highway – or not until much later in the day, if at all.

    This morning it was snowing and slippery – unsanded again – just like yesterday. When I crossed Grand Boulevard, suddenly there was sand and the drive was more pleasant.

    I realize that the highway is shared and maintained by the city in some areas and the province in others, but I don’t understand why those living in the centre of town are safer than my family. Highway of Transportation – where are your sanding crews?

    Reply
  18. There is a serious safety issue at Westshore Parkway and the main highway. During peak traffic time the two left hand turn lanes into the Parkway become full, and overflow out into the Fastlane on the main highway, putting everyone at risk. The light is too quick, it doesn’t empty the lanes. It leaves 1/2 of the cars still waiting to turn. From 3:30-6, the Light needs to be longer. Thanks

    Reply
  19. Hello, I just got back from Kelowna today (Feb. 11) the day after a 20 car collision on the Coquihalla. This crash was caused by Class 1 vehicles that were not able to stop. Thought the driver is always a consideration in a crash and this could have been avoided had they been more diligent… Drivers are difficult to control. However, the road conditions are less difficult. As a driving instructor with 12 years professional experience, driving a vehicle in good condition and snow tires, I had to plan for Class one vehicles to be able to pass me by essentially playing dodge. Knowing that they wouldn’t be able to change course or speed as quickly as they needed to with the roads in such a state. If we can’t change them, we must change the state of the road. Better clearing, salting and general maintenance would go a long way to avoid more collisions in the future. I know the highway is maintained by a private company. But I think either replacing them, supervising them or increasing their funding would make the highway safer and more practical to use.

    Reply
    • Hello sir and thank you for your comment. Our thoughts are with family and friends of those involved in this incident. Highway maintenance is one of the most important services we provide, and safety is our top priority. Ministry staff are reviewing the incident with the maintenance contractor to see if anything else could have been done, within the contracted service levels, to prevent this incident. We also continue to work with the commercial transport industry to identify areas requiring improvement as well. We hope that this information is helpful. Thanks again for connecting with us here.

      Reply