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2,079 comments on “Tell TranBC”

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  1. Hello
    I am
    Wondering how we request the roads especially the shoulders be cleaned between Dutch Creek Bridge and the Hoosdoos Mountain Resort? There are also no lines on the road going south.
    We rise our bikes and have popped a tire because there is so much debris on the road! The lack of lines is very dangerous with the narrow roads and traffic. Please can this be looked at.

    Reply
    • Hi Jane,

      Thanks for your comments about Hwy 93 between Dutch Creek Bridge and Hoodoos Mountain Resort.

      In the East Kootenays the maintenance contractor annually sweeps all highway paved surfaces by mid-June. In the event debris begins to accumulate after, the contractor may complete additional sweeping to ensure safe use by all users. If users find debris on the road, they are welcomed to report it directly to Mainroad East Kootenay Contracting at 1-800-665-4929.

      Line painting in the area usually begins in late spring, typically May, and can extend throughout summer as it is weather dependent. Our line painting contractor will schedule painting in consideration of when local highway maintenance contractors complete their annual sweeping. June saw irregular amounts of rain for most of BC’s interior, including the Columbia Valley, which has delayed painting at times. Paint crews are in working in the East Kootenays this week, working towards completing the line painting.

      Reply
  2. Hello!
    I live on a short, rural, dead end street. The intersection of our street meets the through street in a relatively equal “Y.”
    When we moved here over 20 years ago there was no traffic control for the intersection at all, save for the right of way rules. Someone eventually realized that there was no sign and felt compelled to put up a stop sign for our street.
    Very few drivers stop for this stop sign.
    To my knowledge, the only collision in this intersection involved a neighbour that collided with the signpost.
    Why was it necessary to put up a stop sign instead of a yield sign?
    Both establish the same priority but one requires a complete cessation of movement and the other only requires that to happen when necessary.
    Exchanging the stop sign for a yield sign would legitimize current behaviour, save fuel and wear and tear on the vehicles, would align with practices in other jurisdictions such as the UK and if past lore is correct, will not result in a change to the collision rate.

    Reply
    • Hi Tim,

      Thanks for you your question about having a stop sign vs. a yield sign where your road meets another. Could you please provide the road name and location? This may help with determining the rationale for that traffic signage. Thanks.

      Reply
  3. Tried to use the RV sanitary dump at Bradner Road this morning. The tank was full and the wash-up hose appeared to have been damaged. Who would I report that to?

    Reply
    • Hi Ken. Thanks for reporting. Our maintenance contractor Emil Anderson Maintenance oversees the rest area at Bradner Road: (800) 667-5122.

      Reply
  4. How do I make a formal complaint towards AIM Roads in regards to their complete lack of road brushing? I have sent 2 emails and made a phone call to their number listed on their website with no response.
    I live in Enderby BC, and the growth on the shoulders of the highway and roads here is well over 3 ft tall in some spots. Intersections where side roads meet the highway are becoming dangerous for motorists due to the tall growth obstructing vision of oncoming traffic. The road I live on (Old Salmon Arm Rd) has become so overgrown that it’s single lane traffic.
    I’m completely baffled that this is even an issue. I’ve yet to see any roadsides brushed here in the North Okanagan, and the fact that the Ministry of Transportation has let it go on for this long is disappointing. This is becoming a danger to motorists.

    Reply
    • Thank you for sharing your concerns about our maintenance contractor, Kyra. I’ve shared with our local operations manager, who is responsible for overseeing this contract.

      Reply
  5. The City of Vancouver plans on making school zone speed limits in effect 24/7 rather than the usual 8 AM to 5 PM school days. This presents several concerns regarding driver confusion, consistency across municipalities, and provincial sign standards. Generally, school zones with reduced speeds are considered a special condition. The reason 30 km/h school zones generally have better compliance than a typical 30 km/h speed zone is that drivers consider the 30 km/h school zone reasonable as it is only in effect during school hours and there is an obvious risk of children near the roadway. But a 24/7 school zone won’t seem as reasonable to drivers, therefore compliance will be lower. Consistency across municipalities is another issue. If the City of Vancouver implements 24/7 school zone speed limits but the City of North Vancouver doesn’t, drivers may become confused which is a problem. Currently, no sign exists for a 24/7 30 km/h school zone, at least provincially. So if municipalities are going to be creating their own signs then there will be even greater inconsistency across municipalities which can even further confuse drivers. Also, I’m not even sure if a 24/7 school zone speed limit can be enforced under the MVA. I hope MoTI can look into this and determine if 24/7 30 km/h school zones should be implemented, based on current engineering standards. If they are determined to be implementation worthy then perhaps new signs could be created for the provincial sign catalogue so that signs won’t vary from municipality to municipality. Thank you.

    Reply
      • From our engineering department: Vancouver has the ability to extend the school hours if they feel it’s appropriate. In a dense urban area such as Vancouver, they may very well find there are children on the streets near schools for longer hours.

        Reply
  6. I live with my wife in Christina lake Bc at 69 Franson Rd. Recently a road contractor hired by your government seal coated most of the roads in Christina Lk and pretty much destroyed the roads as we have known them.
    First of all there was nothing wrong with the pavement on my street or most of the other streets. Perhaps some dips and potholes could have been repaired, but seal coating did nothing to fix those problems. All it did was add tar and stones to the dips, which still remain.
    Now most of the streets in town are very rough for walking, bike riding, and with all of the loose stones on corners making it dangerous for cyclists. Not to mention all of the loose stone that have washed up on to all property owners lawns. As well the streets are now extremely noisy when cars pass by, similar to a gravel road. you And as a road cyclist the surface is now to rough to ride on.
    My question to you is: What were you thinking? I have not spoken to anyone in town who is happy with your contractor, or that there was any need for this project. Could it be that the Ministry had money to spend on roads, and this seemed like a good idea. The Contractor had left over tar and stones from another project they needed to get rid of. It has baffled most everyone in town..
    As a lifelong supporter of your government and party, I can’t remember when I have been more disappointed with what you have done.
    Please explain the rationale for this waist of money and stupidity.

    Reply
    • Hi William. Thank you for sharing your concern about the seal coating performed on your local roads. Our maintenance contractor YRB identified several roads with deteriorated pavement that required maintenance to seal out water and prevent pavement breakup, potholing and frost heaves. YRB and ministry staff chose sealcoating as a cost effective way to seal the surface and extend the lifespan of the pavement. It is a ministry approved process and is used throughout the province. There were delays in final sweeping due to cooler weather, which prevented the product from curing, so residual gravel was left on the surface longer than we would have liked.

      YRB has been doing additional sweeping and dust control in response to public feedback. As more vehicle traffic compacts the road, the surface will smoothen out. YRB and our staff are doing frequent patrols to ensure the final product meets ministry specifications. We are sorry for any inconvenience this process has caused.

      Reply
    • Hi Jane,

      Winfield Dr and Rudd Rd are within the District of Sooke. Please contact the District of Sooke, as the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure has no authority over these roads.

      Reply
  7. Please fix Mabel Lake Road!!! Also it is very dangerous going for a walk along Mabel Lake Road from Club Kingfisher to the Marina because the traffic goes by you so fast and there is no path to walk. Please reduce the speed limit to 50 KPH. Some drivers are going even faster than the posted limit and don’t slow down for pedestrians.

    Reply
    • Thanks for your comments, Ruth, about Mabel Lake Road. Work is ongoing to repair potholes and make patches. There is a night shift and a day shift. The last 15 km of the road will be paved to its end, with paving scheduled to happen around the end of this month. I will forward you comments about the speed limit to our operations manager, for their consideration.

      Reply
      • Hi Ruth, a small correction: the last approx 20 km will be paved starting at the 15 km mark. Sorry for the confusion.

        Reply
  8. The Nanaimo Parkway between Aulds Rd and Ware Rd is posted at 80 km/h however I don’t understand why there is a speed limit reduction in this area. There aren’t any major geometric changes to the roadway and most people ignore the speed limit reduction anyway. I am curious why exactly the speed limit reduces to 80 km/h in this area and why it isn’t posted at 90 km/h like the rest of the parkway? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Also, supposedly the entire Nanaimo Parkway was posted at 80 km/h when it first opened but then it was raised to 90 km/h several years later. I wonder if this is actually true. As if it is, then I would guess that the current 80 zone was simply left over for some reason.

      Reply
      • Hi Colton,

        This section of Highway 19 from Aulds Road to to Ware Road is posted at 80 km/h, because there is a lot going on in this three-kilometre-long stretch. There are three signalized intersections, one right in/right out access, and one northbound merge from Highway 19A. This is a lot of traffic interaction and potential for conflict over a short distance. Our records indicate that the 80 km/h speed zone has been in place since 1998, which coincides with the construction of the Nanaimo bypass.

        Safe travels!

        Reply
  9. I live in a mobile home located in Sorrento B.C. My complaint is the semi trucks that come down the hill heading west into Sorrento use their engine brakes constantly and totally unnecessarily. Why is there not a large sign telling these drivers to not use their engine brakes like the one heading east into Sorrento. There is a small sign half way down the hill stating please do not use engine brakes in urban area. Either they do not see this sign or completely ignore it, which is not right! You can hear the trucks coming down the hill kilometres away, and using their engine brakes right through Sorrento. This should be against the law and it is not just the residents that live in our park, its everyone who lives along Hwy 1 in the small and quiet community of Sorrento!

    Reply
    • Hi there Barry – thank you for your comment. We have sent it to our local area staff and will let you know what we hear back. Stay tuned.

      Reply
      • Hi Barry, Our Okanagan Shuswap District will assess the existing engine brake advisory sign (I-076-2) westbound on the Trans-Canada Highway outside of Sorrento. The ministry installs engine brake advisory signs to make truckers mindful of residential areas and aware of noise regulations, as outlined in Division 7A.01 of the BC Motor Vehicle Act Regulations. There is currently no restriction on engine brake use along Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure roads. Engine brakes improve braking capabilities on trucks and safety of their overall operation.

        Reply
    • Hi there Tim – thanks for connecting with us here. It looks like the original layout of the town needed to be worked with in this scenario. You might want to connect with the City of Nanaimo to get a sense of the history of this location to be sure.

      Reply
  10. Hello,
    I am in the market for a ford bronco. I have heard that it is legal to remove the solid top and drive any bronco on the road. But I have also heard that in the fifth generation (1992-1996) it became illegal to drive with the solid top off. I was wondering if there was any truth to this? Is there a site where I could look up other laws such as this one that’s a bit odd.

    Thanks for all the help.

    Reply
    • Hi Nicolas – interesting question. We asked our folks in the CVSE and they advised that it would be best to ask Ford this question directly. Hope that this helps!

      Reply
  11. I am rather puzzled why the Ministry of Transportation would upgrade busy, accident prone, 100 km/h major highways to 4 lanes and sometimes NOT install median barriers. Head on, centre line crossing, collisions must account for a high proportion of fatal and life changing injury MVIs (and highway closures). I understand that it adds to the cost of construction (though it must be more expensive to retrofit them later as is currently being considered for some sections of Highway 97 in the Okanagan). I also understand there is an increase in maintenance costs – e.g. for snow removal and barrier repair. Does the Ministry do a cost-benefit analysis? If so what value does it put on a human life or a life degraded by permanent disability?

    Reply
    • Hi there Nick – thanks for your comment. We constantly monitor highway safety and improve high risk locations wherever we can. We also follow national design guidelines and practices that incorporate road and roadside safety features like travel lane width, shoulder lane width, and clear zones to minimize the crash severity if a vehicle leaves the roadway. If a site has limited width (a common issue in BC) we may not be able to add median barriers. Instead we will look to find alternate ways to improve safety in the area (reduced speed limit, warning signs, etc.) There are currently more that 2,400 km of concrete barriers in place across the province.

      Reply
      • The Clanwilliam upgrade on the Trans-Canada just west of Revelstoke has median barriers for about a third of it’s length. The median is the same width for the full length, whether or not it has barriers. Same thing on some stretches of Highway 97.

        Reply
  12. I would like to know how to add speed bumps into my neighborhood as the traffic has pick up. We are a strata and have good amount of kids in the neighborhood.

    Reply
    • Hi there Todd – thanks for your question. Where exactly are you located? That will help us determine if this is an “us” question or one that is better sent to your local municipality.

      Reply
    • Hello Joe! Are you referring to the Visitor Info Centres across the province or our Transportation Management Centre for DriveBC? If you are looking for employment with DriveBC (the provincial government) you can check our employment opportunities website here: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/careers-myhr/job-seekers/current-job-postings
      If you are looking for work with a visitor info centre – we encourage you to contact the location you are interested in directly for more details. Hope that this helps – good luck!

      Reply
  13. Driving the Malahat the other day, it became clear that the speed limit is way off the speeds that people are travelling at. For context, I had my cruise set at 85 km/h in the 80 zone near the Malahat Village area and I was passed by virtually everyone. The fact that the Malahat used to have a speed limit of 60 mph (97 km/h) in the 1960s when the road was completely undivided, had no passing lanes, and had no roadside barrier in some spots as well as cars at the time being infinitely less safe than cars today. But now that the majority of the Malahat is divided with passing lanes and many more roadside protections, the speed limit is only 80 km/h. I hope a speed limit review could be conducted on the Malahat to ensure the speed limit is set appropriately.

    Reply
  14. Re: Project No. 24977-0000 Schedule T3 – Specific Reference Documents
    Bridge Deck Resurfacing – Athalmer Bridge No. 0517, Carbon Creek Bridge No. 0769, Fort Steele Overpass No. 2371, Little Fairy Creek Bridge No. 1191

    over the weekend i spent almost 3 hours stuck in a long line of cars on Highway three between the BC/Alberta boarder and Fernie. On Friday it took me 45 minutes to get into Fernie from Sparwood because the bridge is down to one lane and the only controls in place are a traffic light that gives equal time for each direction to cross the bridge. then on Sunday i spent almost 2 hours waiting to get a cross the carbon creek bridge. Traffic was backed up all the way to Sparwood (11 km away). There was no traffic traveling westbound on highway 3 yet the traffic light controlling traffic on that bridge was also giving equal time for both directions.

    Can you please do something about this? in this day and age there is no reason why traffic should be held up for 11 km in one direction and 0 km in the other.

    Further to this, why would you make the decision to kick off these projects the week before one of the busiest summer driving weekends in Canada? could you not have waited 1 extra week to shut down these bridges?

    Reply
    • Hello Joe – sorry for your frustration. We have heard from others on this issue as well. We spoke with our local area staff to determine what went wrong and they let us know that Little Fairy Creek Bridge, on the eastern edge of Fernie, and Carbon Creek Bridge, approximately 5km west of the BC/Alberta border, are currently undergoing bridge deck reconstruction. Since the project began single lane alternating traffic has been required for the duration with no opportunity to open the lane under construction, even when work is not in process. An approved traffic management plan was submitted by the project contractor which included automated traffic signals and traffic delays of up to 20 minutes. The weekend of June 27th saw extended delays beyond the approved 20 minutes with the type of lights being used. This coincided with phase three relaxation of the Covid 19 restrictions, the end of the school year and increased travel into BC. The original traffic signals were exchanged following June 27th to traffic signals with sensors that can better manage uneven traffic flow. Unfortunately, with extensive volume of long weekend traffic travelling east on Highway 3, the upgraded traffic signals were overwhelmed as well. Traffic control personnel took over at Little Fairy Creek Bridge in Fernie to aid in traffic movement, unfortunately the backlog continued and was experienced at Carbon Creek Bridge. Ministry staff have informed the contractor that the expectation is for the contractor to have traffic control personnel at the ready for weekend traffic management for both bridges until the project is complete. We understand that traffic volumes increase during the summer months; however, summer is also often the only time we are able to undertake some of our construction projects. Wherever possible, we aim to schedule work outside of busy times and again we apologize for the inconvenience. We hope that this information is helpful. If you have any other concerns, please let us know.

      Reply
  15. Hi,
    I was travelling eastbound yesterday from Sparwood at 6PM on Highway three. Although no work was being completed on the bridge resurfacing, traffic was limited to one lane with automated traffic control (portable lights). Highway three was backed up bumper to bumper for 21km, taking 2 hours to travel eastbound through the construction site. The westbound lane had THREE vehicles waiting at the automated light. This could be addressed with flag people or extending the eastbound lights on Sundays and Westbound on Fridays. Either way, there were several safety concerns such as; people passing on double solid lines, driving on the shoulder/ditch, increased response time for emergency services etc. It was unsettling to see this was all caused by a poorly timed automated traffic device. It was also concerning there was no police/traffic control to address a 21km back up.

    Reply
    • Hello Chris,

      Thanks for your message and our apologies for this delay. We reached out to our staff in the area to share your concern and they let us know that Little Fairy Creek Bridge, on the eastern edge of Fernie, and Carbon Creek Bridge, approximately 5km west of the BC/Alberta border, are currently undergoing bridge deck reconstruction. Since the project began single lane alternating traffic has been required for the duration with no opportunity to open the lane under construction, even when work is not in process. An approved traffic management plan was submitted by the project contractor which included automated traffic signals and traffic delays of up to 20 minutes. The weekend of June 27th saw extended delays beyond the approved 20 minutes with the type of lights being used. This coincided with phase three relaxation of the Covid 19 restrictions, the end of the school year and increased travel into BC. The original traffic signals were exchanged following June 27th to traffic signals with sensors that can better manage uneven traffic flow. Unfortunately, with extensive volume of long weekend traffic travelling east on Highway 3, the upgraded traffic signals were overwhelmed as well. Traffic control personnel took over at Little Fairy Creek Bridge in Fernie to aid in traffic movement, unfortunately the backlog continued and was experienced at Carbon Creek Bridge. Ministry staff have informed the contractor that the expectation is for the contractor to have traffic control personnel at the ready for weekend traffic management for both bridges until the project is complete.

      We hope that this information is helpful and again, our apologies for the delays.

      Reply
  16. Why is there not a sign like the one near Bear Mountain for one on one merging at the top of the Goldstream Tunnel area instead of the move left sign. It was an hour waiting in line to get back to Victoria. Needs some definite better planning!!!

    Reply
    • Hello Karen – thanks for your message. Just to better understand – was there an issue with the merge point at Tunnel Hill on the Malahat heading south into Victoria? This can be a pinch point for traffic as they are required to reduce to one lane moving down through the park and traffic volumes can exacerbate it. There is a merge sign at this location, but not a larger “Alternate when Merging” sign as seen at the Leigh Road interchange location.

      Reply
  17. Hi there,

    I am looking for some information on where sandwich boards are allowed to be placed and BC highways and what the regulations are regarding securing them to light posts along the highway.

    Thanks

    Reply
  18. The Duffy Lake road is a motorcycle destination and the road is dangerous! The road workers have put loose tar on the sides of the road and corners in good intentions however the trailers and trucks have cut the road causing the small rocks to go into the road. With the motorcycles riding through the corners it is so dangerous. This is a very poor decision on how to build up the sides of the road. PLEASE send a road sweeper or people to clear the road. This is before Joffre Lakes Provincial Park for about 7 km.

    Reply
    • Hello Cathy – thanks for sharing your concern with us here. We will send your message to our local area staff for review. You can report road condition concerns anytime, anywhere in the province by using our report a problem feature on DriveBC. You can choose your location and connect directly with the maintenance contractor responsible for the highway to report your concern. Thanks again!

      https://www.drivebc.ca/rahp/identifyRegion.html

      Reply
  19. How can we make a complaint to address a traffic issue?

    On July 6, 2020, we were driving east on Highway 3 and waited for two hours between Sparwood and the Alberta border. When we finally got to the front of the long line of cars, we discovered that the hold up was because traffic was down to an alternating single lane, being regulated by a stop light. The issue was that the stoplight was set for even time intervals for both directions of traffic. This was a poor planning decision, given that on a Sunday evening, the majority of traffic in that area is going east from Fernie back to Calgary. When we got to the stoplight, there was a single car waiting to go West, while traffic going East comprised a line of cars backed up all the way west of Sparwood. This seems an illogical planning decision. This traffic light should be set to reflect traffic realities in that area (heavy westward flow on Fridays, heavy eastward flow on Sundays). Is it possible to proactively address this issue to prevent future delays?

    Reply
    • Hello Lora. Thank you for taking the time to connect with us here to share your concerns. We shared your comment with our local area staff and they let us know that Little Fairy Creek Bridge, on the eastern edge of Fernie, and Carbon Creek Bridge, approximately 5km west of the BC/Alberta border, are currently undergoing bridge deck reconstruction. Since the project began single lane alternating traffic has been required for the duration with no opportunity to open the lane under construction, even when work is not in process. An approved traffic management plan was submitted by the project contractor which included automated traffic signals and traffic delays of up to 20 minutes. The weekend of June 27th saw extended delays beyond the approved 20 minutes with the type of lights being used. This coincided with phase three relaxation of the Covid 19 restrictions, the end of the school year and increased travel into BC. The original traffic signals were exchanged following June 27th to traffic signals with sensors that can better manage uneven traffic flow. Unfortunately, with extensive volume of long weekend traffic travelling east on Highway 3, the upgraded traffic signals were overwhelmed as well. Traffic control personnel took over at Little Fairy Creek Bridge in Fernie to aid in traffic movement, unfortunately the backlog continued and was experienced at Carbon Creek Bridge. Ministry staff have informed the contractor that the expectation is for the contractor to have traffic control personnel at the ready for weekend traffic management for both bridges until the project is complete.

      We hope that this helps and again, our apologies.

      Reply
  20. Hello.
    There is no Yield signs on Jubilee Parkway in intersection Dogwood St and Highway 19A, You should install that make it safer.

    What is the year of Jubilee Parkway built?

    Reply
  21. I had the terrible misfortune of coming through Fernie, and Sparwood, back to Alberta today. With the endless Bridge construction on the road, the traffic is incredible. It is easily less than three hours for me to do that trip, it took me four and three-quarter hours today. At one of the sites just out of Fernie, they had flag people they’re letting traffic through. All the other ones, there was no traffic flagging and the lights are set up but there was probably 50 vehicles going back to Alberta to every 1 coming in. It took me an hour to get through Fernie. Then, The traffic was backed up all the way from Sparwood to the construction near the Alberta border. That is normally about a 10 minute drive, I was in traffic for well over an hour, and then I started driving up the shoulder, because my vehicle was overheating from all the stop and go. I strongly suggest you shut construction down on the weekends, and have people flagging traffic. I’m sure this isn’t the first weekend you had problems there, because some of that construction looks like it’s been going on for quite a while. Maybe somebody better start paying attention to the traffic congestion before you kill a bunch of people in head-on accidents because people start driving in the oncoming lane, and in the shoulder, after sitting in traffic for an hour, and maybe only getting 1 mile.
    I don’t require a reply,

    Reply
    • Hello Dale – thanks for your comment. We did share your comment with our local area staff and they advised us that Little Fairy Creek Bridge, on the eastern edge of Fernie, and Carbon Creek Bridge, approximately 5km west of the BC/Alberta border, are currently undergoing bridge deck reconstruction. Since the project began single lane alternating traffic has been required for the duration with no opportunity to open the lane under construction, even when work is not in process. An approved traffic management plan was submitted by the project contractor which included automated traffic signals and traffic delays of up to 20 minutes. The weekend of June 27th saw extended delays beyond the approved 20 minutes with the type of lights being used. This coincided with phase three relaxation of the Covid 19 restrictions, the end of the school year and increased travel into BC. The original traffic signals were exchanged following June 27th to traffic signals with sensors that can better manage uneven traffic flow. Unfortunately, with extensive volume of long weekend traffic travelling east on Highway 3, the upgraded traffic signals were overwhelmed as well. Traffic control personnel took over at Little Fairy Creek Bridge in Fernie to aid in traffic movement, unfortunately the backlog continued and was experienced at Carbon Creek Bridge. Ministry staff have informed the contractor that the expectation is for the contractor to have traffic control personnel at the ready for weekend traffic management for both bridges until the project is complete.

      We hope that this helps!

      Reply
  22. Please improve the construction zones around Fernie! Travelers are delayed by 3-6 hours!!! This is unacceptable!!

    Reply
    • Hello Karen – thank you for reaching out to us here – we apologize for the delay. Little Fairy Creek Bridge, on the eastern edge of Fernie, and Carbon Creek Bridge, approximately 5km west of the BC/Alberta border, are currently undergoing bridge deck reconstruction. Since the project began single lane alternating traffic has been required for the duration with no opportunity to open the lane under construction, even when work is not in process. An approved traffic management plan was submitted by the project contractor which included automated traffic signals and traffic delays of up to 20 minutes. The weekend of June 27th saw extended delays beyond the approved 20 minutes with the type of lights being used. This coincided with phase three relaxation of the Covid 19 restrictions, the end of the school year and increased travel into BC. The original traffic signals were exchanged following June 27th to traffic signals with sensors that can better manage uneven traffic flow. Unfortunately, with extensive volume of long weekend traffic travelling east on Highway 3, the upgraded traffic signals were overwhelmed as well. Traffic control personnel took over at Little Fairy Creek Bridge in Fernie to aid in traffic movement, unfortunately the backlog continued and was experienced at Carbon Creek Bridge. Ministry staff have informed the contractor that the expectation is for the contractor to have traffic control personnel at the ready for weekend traffic management for both bridges until the project is complete.

      Reply
  23. Sorry for posting yet again but yesterday, July 3rd, I noticed a safety issue on Highway 1 near Cedar that I hope can be addressed. When driving northbound at about 11 AM at about the halfway point between Cedar Rd and Timberlands Rd there was what looked to be a barbeque food stand set up on the shoulder of the highway. Later when traveling southbound at about 2 PM, the stand was still operating there. From my understanding, they would need permission from MoTI to set up on a highway right-of-way. Obviously, setting up a food stand right on the shoulder of a busy highway presents several safety issues. Vehicles have to slow down significantly on the highway to be able to park on the shoulder to access the food stand, which could cause rear-end collisions. Vehicles leaving the food stand than have to merge back on the highway from a complete stop. I don’t travel this section of Highway 1 very often so I’m not sure if this was a one-day thing or not but I hope the ministry could check the area over the next few weeks to ensure that the stand isn’t set up again. If it is set up again, perhaps have the stand moved to a nearby side road to have safer ingress and egress for vehicles. Thank you!

    Reply
  24. Has Horizontal Directional Drilling equipment ever been used in BC to clear blocked highway culverts? Might be useful to have on call for incidents like the recent one that closed the Trans-Canada for 24 hours.

    Reply
  25. Feel free to observe drag racing with junky uninsured vehicles on Island Hwy and Victoria Street Nanaimo. Constant flow of dirty noisy cars fleeing McDonalds and the Shell station.

    Reply
    • Hello Kris – thanks for your interest in our EIT program. We typically launch our hiring campaign for the TELP/EIT/GIT program in late December or early January, so we encourage you to check back with us then. Best of luck!

      Reply
  26. Hello,
    I am a resident of Vernon BC who commutes to Kelowna 6 days a week.
    I have observed an ongoing safety concern related to the crosswalk on HWY 97 at the Vernon General Hospital (21st Ave).

    When traveling downhill (north bound) it is extremely difficult to identify if traffic in front is stopping for an obscured pedestrian because most vehicles are already braking due to the grade.

    Heading uphill (southbound), especially when the left turn lane is busy (traffic turning to hospital) it is very difficult to see pedestrians on the hospital side until the last moment. Due to the grade, vehicles can stop very quickly which can be dangerous for the vehicle behind who may be accelerating up and cannot see what is happening ahead.

    I personally have nearly been rear ended over a dozen times and have resorted to “flashing” my brakes when stopping for crossing pedestrians and occasionally using evasive maneuvers!

    My understanding is that there isn’t room for a pedestrian overpass and that a traffic stop light would be quite disruptive to traffic flow.

    Is there any reason why a lighting system couldn’t be installed which flashes extra bright warning lights when activated by a crossing pedestrian so approaching traffic is alerted well in advance up and down the hill?

    Would this not be a simple way to help prevent vehicle accidents and reduce pedestrian risk before the long dark winter nights are back?

    I look forward to your response

    Calle Mirkowsky

    Reply
    • Hello Calle,

      Thank you for your message. We shared it with our staff in the area and they have let us know that our engineers have reviewed the crosswalk for lightning and determined flashing lights are not recommended due to safety concerns with traffic stopping for flashing lights as well as pedestrian sense of safety when a light is flashing rather than relying on traffic stopping and crossing when safe to do so. We have installed LED lights at the crosswalk itself to assist with illumination when dark and have some enhanced signage that should be installed later this year. We will monitor how that performs and determine if any additional steps are necessary. We hope that this information is helpful.

      Reply
  27. The current speed limit drop from 90 km/h to 60 km/h on Highway 19 through the Nanoose Bay area is very sudden and many motorists seem to get caught off guard by the significant drop in the speed limit. Especially in the southbound direction as the speed limit changes from 110 km/h to 90 km/h not very far before Nanoose Bay and motorists are typically travelling in excess of 100 km/h just before the 60 km/h zone which results in very significant braking to be able to slow down in time before the limit drops to 60 km/h. I hope an 80 km/h transition zone could be considered in both the northbound and southbound direction before the drop to 60 km/h as it would allow a more gradual decrease in speed as opposed to the current situation of people having to slow down 30 km/h or more. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hello again Colton,
      Here’s what we heard back. A speed drop of 30 km/h is allowable under current traffic engineering speed zone setting guidelines. Speed drops of <=30 km/h are used throughout the province without additional transition zones. The 110 km/h zone located to the north (for southbound traffic) that the writer refers to is actually 7 km away. The ministry has installed speed reader boards in conjunction with the regular speed limit signs as an additional to reminder to drivers of their speed. Our engineers also let us know that the 60 km/h zone is in place due to the geometry and intersection control (horizontal curves and relatively steep downhill approach to the signalized intersection. We hope that this information is helpful!

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