Tell TranBC

Tell TranBCWhat Do You Want to Know More About?

Are you looking for something on TranBC but can’t find it?

Or have a question about what the ministry does and why we do it?

Share your question with us and we’ll try to get you an answer.

Who knows – your question could be our next blog!

Thank you – we couldn’t do this without YOU.

1,653 comments on “Tell TranBC”

Leave a Reply to Nick Thomas Cancel reply

  1. Dear Person in charge,

    As many in Canada know Victoria BC experienced one of its rare days of heavy snowfall this January 13-14. I have a well equipped car with dedicated winter tires, while I was on the road on the Wednesday I encountered two BC Transit buses that were stuck: one in an intersection, the other halfway out of its bus stop. Both of these were an extreme hazard for other vehicles. I feel that it is an act of managerial negligence to send out buses without chains or winter tires onto streets with 20cm or more of snow. It is an endangerment to their employees, the paying passengers looking for a safe mode of transport, and to the public who have to negotiate around these unsafe buses. To claim the cost of chains or winter tires exceeds the needs of safety is a position out of the coal industry era. This happens almost once a year to five times a year. Does someone have to die before BC Transit is forced to chain up their buses? Wednesday’s snow event was predicted days prior which gave lots of time for maintenance to put on chains or decent winter tires. Please initiate a solution prior to serious injury or death occurs.

    Andrew Crowe

    Reply
  2. The Town of View Royal tells me that your ministry is responsible for Admirals Rd. Twice I have seen northbound drivers move into the southbound left turn lane at Glentana Rd. in an attempt to access the Canadian Tire parking lot. Almost all the painting on the roadway has disappeared, especially that in the southbound left turn lane. Although there is a striped yellow & black sign directing northbound drivers to keep right, it is small and obviously easy to miss.

    Reply
  3. I just read your Jan 6 reply to the comments of Roy Price where you are encouraging people to send their concerns directly to the contractor for their area, and I have to say that you are completely missing the point. People are concerned for their safety, and they want this agency to act as watchdog, to ensure that the contractors are doing an adequate job.
    Here in the Okanagan, AIM Roads has recently gone to the media to ask that the public stop making threatening and harassing calls to there office. While I agree 100% that this behavior is completely unacceptable, it also feels like a deflection from the fact that people are beyond frustrated with the poor service this company has been providing since it took over the contract for this area. Some of us are not only concerned for the safety of our families, but are also experiencing a negative affect on our abilities to do our jobs and earn an income.
    I don’t think it is at all unreasonable that tax-payers do not want to talk directly to a for-profit company when it comes to their safety, they want to know that somebody in the government is holding them accountable.

    Reply
    • Hi Aaron and thanks for your comment – we completely understand your concern.

      Ministry staff regularly audit and monitor contractor performance in addition to communicating with them on a daily basis. We have a comprehensive quality plan to assess the performance of our contractors. It involves monitoring hundreds of records and audits, to determine whether contractors are meeting the maintenance specifications. The maintenance contract includes tools to address “non-conformance”, through escalating intervention measures based on the seriousness of the “non-conformance”. Some of the tools include “non-conformance” reports and notices to comply.

      This intensive monitoring occurs at all hours both during storms and between significant weather events. The contractor is required to keep records to demonstrate compliance with the maintenance specifications and to have a quality control and a quality assurance program to demonstrate they’re meeting the contract requirements.

      If monitoring shows deficiencies in performance or response, ministry staff will work with the contractor to ensure they quickly improve and deliver quality maintenance and safe highway conditions. Penalties can result from a continuous inability to meet our maintenance specifications. If the contractor regularly fails to address non-conformances , they can lose points in their performance “audit” which may lead to loss of their contractor assessment performance payment, which is up to two per cent of the full value of the contract. At times, the weather and road conditions can change quickly. When this happens, both ministry staff and our maintenance contractors follow up to ensure specified patrol timeframes were met. Senior ministry staff regularly audit contractor performance to ensure contractors are meeting our strict specifications and work with them to swiftly resolve any issues.

      We have shared your concern about Acciona, directly with staff responsible for monitoring and auditing. Hope that this information is helpful.

      Reply
  4. I travel Gordon Drive From Springfield Road crossing Highway 97 in evening peak hour traffic. I HAVE NOTICED AFTER SITTING IN TRAFFIC AT THE INTERSECTION OF Gordon GOING NORTH CROSSING HARVEY THE TRAFFIC IS SEVERELY BACK LOGGED AND AT A STAND STILL IN PEAK HOUR TRAFFIC. The Green light on Gordon drive and Highway 97 changed after 12 seconds allowing the Highway 97 more time at a green light. I am not sure why this has changed but as a motorist sitting in evening traffic for 5 sets of lights from Sutherland Ave to Highway 97 I find this is appalling. With the slippery roads this past week this is not allowing motorists to travel with due care and attention through this intersection. This is also a red light camera intersection are you just trying to create more revenue?

    Reply
    • Hi there Leonie,

      Thanks for your comment. We have sent it forward to our staff in the area for review. We will let you know what we hear back.

      Reply
  5. Where are you? What are you doing? The entire Coquitlam and Burnaby is like ice rink. You guys haven’t plowed anything. Don’t tell me you haven done your best because you haven’t. Your best was last year and we have seen it.

    Reply
    • Hi Arezou,

      Thanks for your comment. We have shared your concern directly with our staff responsible for monitoring our maintenance contractors for review.

      Reply
  6. Why was there no sand on the Coquihalla south of the snow shed on sunday evening jan 12 2020 ?. we were 1km from the pileup around 7pm . The road showed no signs of sand anywhere . Walking was bad enough . I can just imagine the cost of damage to trucks ,cars plus towing . The snow clearing contractor should be sued for such garbage service. The highway east of Kamloops was bad but you could actually see that they were sanded.

    Reply
  7. It is my understanding, that safety and road conditions of HWY1 is under provincial control.
    Well, the latest winter storm clearly shows, that the province is not prepared to follow up on the duties to keep the people safe and sound.
    24-36 hours after the last snow has fallen the highway between Chilliwack and Abbotsford is still a mess. A blank sheet of ice quite literally and it is beyond me, why a industrialized country cannot take better care of their winter road conditions, having known, that this type of weather event is happening.
    With this event being just one in many events in recent years, where the provincial duty of care is out the window, I wonder if you will ever be prepared for snow and ice.

    Reply
    • Hi Frank. Thanks for your comment.

      In the Fraser Valley, the high outflow winds combined with cold and dry temperatures (-12 yesterday morning) made it challenging to keep material on the road and deal with the snow that compacted onto the road. The ministry’s maintenance contractor for this service area had their entire fleet out working yesterday morning, and continued to do so throughout the day and overnight.

      West of Chilliwack, areas requiring further attention by the maintenance contractor persisted into yesterday morning. Because the colder temperatures limited the effectiveness of applying salt, crews transitioned to applying sand in combination with using serrated blades to rake the compacted snow to improve traction. The contractor has also been using deicing chemicals better suited for the colder temperatures in addition to an increased use of abrasives and the serrated blades. In the Fraser Valley alone as of yesterday, the maintenance contractor had used 10 times the amount of material (salt, brine, abrasives, seizing chemicals) during the storm event compared to the total used this winter up to Thursday. They deploy a fleet of 40 plow trucks and 5 graders to meet the conditions.

      We advise travellers to expect winter conditions for the rest of the week, and encourages everyone to plan ahead and drive according to the weather and road conditions, slowing down when there’s bad weather or limited visibility. Also, keep space between yourself and the vehicle in front of you so you can stop safely when needed and keeping well back of all the winter maintenance equipment on the highway so crews have room to perform their maintenance safely. A reminder also that winter tire regulations are in effect, and drivers are encouraged to get the best tires they can. People should ensure their vehicles have tires with the mountain/snowflake or mud and snow (M + S) symbol when travelling on designated routes.

      Reply
  8. In the current cold windy weather there is a big problem on the highways because it is too cold for salt to be effective and sand is being blown off either by the wind or passing traffic. I believe that the Ministry does not approve mixed salt/sand loads which might help the sand adhere to icy road surfaces. What is the Ministry’s approved treatment for roads in this weather?

    Reply
    • Hi Nick. During periods of cold temperatures, the straight application of salt may not be effective, and sometimes maintenance contractors need to apply salt mixed with sand to improve traction to areas where snow may have compacted.

      Reply
  9. The snow removal around the greater Vancouver region highways is absolutely atrocious. Not a single highway I was on this am had even begun to be plowed or salted in either direction. This is absolutely un acceptable. Crews should be on call and clearing roads before rush hr. The snow had stoped falling and still I saw no indication that anything was even begun. It’s absolutely irresponsible that according to documentation you allow a two day grace period to get roads cleared for your contractors.

    Do better.

    Reply
    • Hi April,

      Thanks for your message and concern. Since Thursday night, the ministry’s maintenance contractors in Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley have been out in full force, day and night, plowing roads and applying salt, brine and winter abrasives as required. During periods of cold temperatures, the straight application of salt may not be effective, and sometimes maintenance contractors need to apply salt mixed with sand to improve traction to areas where snow may have compacted.

      In the Fraser Valley, the high outflow winds combined with cold and dry temperatures (- 12 this morning) are making it challenging to keep material on the road and deal with the snow that has compacted onto the road. The ministry’s maintenance contractor for this service area had their entire fleet out working this morning, and will continue to do so throughout the day as well as overnight. West of Chilliwack, areas requiring further attention by the maintenance contractor persisted into this morning. Because the colder temperatures limited the effectiveness of applying salt, crews transitioned to applying sand in combination with using serrated blades to rake the compacted snow to improve traction. The contractor has also been using deicing chemicals better suited for the colder temperatures in addition to an increased use of abrasives and the serrated blades. Our maintenance contractor in the Fraser Valley alone has used 600t of salt, 200m3 of brine and approximately 6,000m3 of sand – enough to fill more than two Olympic size swimming pools. The use of abrasives and calcium in the last 48 hours has also already surpassed what was used since winter conditions arrived in the Lower Mainland in these past few weeks. They deploy a fleet of 40 plow trucks and 5 graders to meet the conditions.

      We advise travellers to expect winter conditions for the rest of the week, and encourage everyone to plan ahead and drive according to the weather and road conditions, slowing down when there’s bad weather or limited visibility.

      Reply
  10. Hello,
    My car was damaged with the falling ice on the Port Mann bridge. It was not only the glass but the hood, roof, and side was damaged. Are there any reimbursement for of my deductible for this?

    Reply
  11. Today’s commute on the #1 from Langley into Burnaby, was a mess. The Port Mann was a sheet of ice. It didn’t look like the freeway was prepared properly for a snowstorm we all knew was coming?
    This is unacceptable road conditions. Get this dealt with please. You should have been ready for these conditions and prepped the roads accordingly.

    Reply
    • Hi Mike,

      Thanks for your comment. We completely understand your concern.
      Since Thursday night, the ministry’s maintenance contractors in Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley have been out in full force, day and night, plowing roads and applying salt, brine and winter abrasives as required. During periods of cold temperatures, the straight application of salt may not be effective, and sometimes maintenance contractors need to apply salt mixed with sand to improve traction to areas where snow may have compacted.

      In the Fraser Valley, the high outflow winds combined with cold and dry temperatures (- 12 this morning) are making it challenging to keep material on the road and deal with the snow that has compacted onto the road. The ministry’s maintenance contractor for this service area had their entire fleet out working this morning, and will continue to do so throughout the day as well as overnight. West of Chilliwack, areas requiring further attention by the maintenance contractor persisted into this morning. Because the colder temperatures limited the effectiveness of applying salt, crews transitioned to applying sand in combination with using serrated blades to rake the compacted snow to improve traction. The contractor has also been using deicing chemicals better suited for the colder temperatures in addition to an increased use of abrasives and the serrated blades. Our maintenance contractor in the Fraser Valley alone has used 600t of salt, 200m3 of brine and approximately 6,000m3 of sand – enough to fill more than two Olympic size swimming pools. The use of abrasives and calcium in the last 48 hours has also already surpassed what was used since winter conditions arrived in the Lower Mainland in these past few weeks. They deploy a fleet of 40 plow trucks and 5 graders to meet the conditions.

      We advise travellers to expect winter conditions for the rest of the week, and encourage everyone to plan ahead and drive according to the weather and road conditions, slowing down when there’s bad weather or limited visibility.

      Reply
  12. I live in Dean Park, North Saanich and I use the Multi-Round About that is located off the Pat Bay highway and intersects various roads to the Airport, Sidney, and North Saanich. The main concern of this very useful Round About System is Canora Road from the airport direction and Yield and Entrance onto the Round About; specifically cars that are heading towards the on-ramp of the Pat Bay highway. At least twice per week, sometimes more often I have a near collison with cars that WILL NOT yield left to cars (me and others) that are in the Round About and trying to exit towards McTavish Rd near the Park and Ride Bus Terminal.

    Please note that since “birth” we have all been groomed to “yield to the right of way” for on-coming traffic. Yet with the Round About System one must yield “left” to traffic within the round about ( or circle as some call it). Unlike the United Kingdom where traffic does yield “right of way” as they drive on the other side of the road. People who are un-familar with Round Abouts just don’t look left!

    Frequently, I notice drivers approaching the Round About on Canaora road from the Airport “looking right, towards the Park and Ride and McTavish Road and then driving directly into my path (approaching from the left) as I drive around the Round About proceeding to “exit towards McTavish Road.

    Many of these cars likely are coming from the Airport in Rental Vehicles and they have no clue on how to yield, enter and exit a Round About. There have been numerous crashes at this point of the Multi Round About System.

    NOTE: The car rental companies at the Airport should provide a map of this multi Round About System that has notes on the requirement to “Yield Left” to cars within this Round about system!

    I and many others from North Saanich and elsewhere are fed up ramming our brakes and blowing the horn at people who just won’t yield correctly.

    It is to the point where I would prefer an Actual Stop Sign or Red Flashing Light at this particular entrance of Canora Rd and the Round About. People are too focused on looking at the on-ramp to the Pat Bay Highway that is to their frontal view. Failing that recommendation, the Yield Signs should indicate a Flashing “Yield Left to cars within the Round About”!!

    Something needs to be improved at this Canora road entrance before there is a major fatality.

    Interestingly, I visit the UK once per year and have noticed that at very busy Round Abouts, they have actually installed red lights or stop signs due the high increase in traffic and difficulties in entering and exiting specific (high traffic) Round Abouts.

    Some form of improved traffic control should be considered especially at the area I mentioned as it is now beyond frustrating.

    Thank you for your consideration.

    Reply
    • Hello Court and thank you for your comment. We have shared it forward with our local area traffic engineers and will let you know what we hear back.

      Reply
  13. I would like to comment on the recent “improvement project” for the intersection of Balmoral Rd & TCH in Blind Bay. What a horrendous amount of money spent on what I would consider a band aid solution at best. As a resident I now have to take the frontage road to access TCH going eastbound. This road is not designed for the volume of traffic which will now utilize this route not to mention small one way tunnels and no merge lane on to the highway once you gain access. The alternate route to drive up Golf Course Drive is also unacceptable, Golf Course Drive is not designed to take this amount of traffic and endangers our residents due to volume & speed of commuters. (No sidewalk, no lines on the road, people travelling well over the 50 km speed limit posted). Why couldn’t traffic lights be installed at this intersection timed to operate when a driver is waiting to go eastbound? Simple solution which would keep people safe and maybe slow down the semis going 130km down the highway. I’ve already witnessed first hand the stupid actions people will take to go eastbound including turning into the left hand turn lane on the highway to avoid taking alternate routes. Can’t wait for tourist season when this problem will come to a head with further accidents & casualties

    Reply
    • Hello Joan and thank you for your message.

      We shared your comment with our local area staff who advised us that we have reconfigured the intersection of Highway 1 and Balmoral to improve safety as this intersection has had a higher than average collision rate, mostly due to traffic turning left onto the highway or across it. The new configuration allows for right turn-in, right turn-out and left turn-in movements on the highway, with a protected left turn bay. We appreciate the feedback provided by people who live and work in the community when public engagement was carried out in summer 2019. Community feedback led us to expand the project with highway acceleration lanes in both directions, further enhancing safety at the intersection. The existing nearby underpasses let us safely address the concerns at this location without the considerable expense of constructing an overpass. This approach leaves more funds available for other safety and improvement projects across the region, increasing overall safety and reliability. Drivers on Balmoral Road wanting to cross the highway, or make a left turn onto Highway 1, are required to use the nearby underpass. Many residents were previously using these side roads to avoid left turns onto the highway, since doing so is safer and often quicker. Additionally, staff will install road signs with clear instructions to guide traffic using the route. We hope that this information is helpful. Thanks again for your note.

      Reply
  14. When is the highways dept. going to figure out how to make the Taylor hill passable? Use some larger sized sand , maybe 3/4 crush, yesterday with 2 sets of chains all I did was spin, no chains would be better, chains do not dig into pavement. Get your head out of your ….., I get up lots of worse hills in the province.

    Reply
    • Hi there Brett – we shared your comment with our local area staff and they asked us to clarify if this was on North or South Taylor Hill – as there are different maintenance contractors in place for each.

      Reply
  15. Thanks for allowing us to comment on the truck lane restriction on the coq. This at present is the most disrespectful law that has been placed many places in N. America. I would like to get further involved to find a better solution . Thank you.

    Reply
  16. Before commencing upgrades of the Trans-Canada Highway from Kamloops to the Alberta Border did the government consider the alternative of upgrading Highway 5 and 16 to the Yellowhead Pass? This would almost certainly have been more feasible, significantly cheaper, and faster to construct. Although slightly longer it would have made a better route for long haul commercial haulage with lower grades and fewer avalanche closures. Instead we face the prospect of a Kamloops to Alberta Border Program that might take another 50 or more years to complete. I think it is actually more likely it will be abandoned before completion leaving some accident and closure prone 2 lane bottlenecks forever. (Restatement of a question that was never fully answered and now appears to have been lost)

    Reply
    • Hi Nick,

      The ministry considers all potential options and weighs the pros and cons of each during that consideration. We are continuously assessing our highways systems and looking for ways to improve them as the safety of the travelling public is our key priority. We understand your frustration and concern and want to reassure you that we are working diligently at improving this important stretch of highway.

      Reply
  17. I am looking for information on the high occupancy vehicle lane application for clean energy vehicles. However, when I put the topic in the search box, the system says it has never heard of it.
    Please direct me to the correct url.
    Many thanks

    Reply
  18. I think something is wrong with the website here…above where I’m typing it states there’s 1,610 comments….yet only 1 is visible. Might be a good idea to get a tech to fix things so one can access all the comments.

    Reply
  19. Hi there. I have a concern regarding the construction speed zone for the Hwy 1 1/Douglas Street southbound bus lane project between the Burnside Bridge and Tolmie Ave. A construction zone speed limit of 60 km/h between Tillicum Rd and Harriet Rd has been in place for about 6 months when work was in progress but now that work has finished on this section the construction zone speed limit has been left in place for no obvious reason. I hope you can address this concern. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Hi Nick – thanks for your note. We recently switched over to a new theme here and have had a glitch on this page. We are aware and working on restoring it.

      Reply
  20. Lately the highways around Clearwater are terrible……I’ve been driving for over 55 years and lived in many places around the western provinces, and NEVER have I seen the highways in this bad of shape. I know we’ve had snow in the last while, guess what? Not the first snow fall! The other day the highway was so rough we were down to 30 km per hour. Very dangerous…..someones not doing their job!!

    Reply
    • Hello Roy – thank you for your message and your concern.

      We encourage you to lodge your concern directly with the maintenance contractor for the area, Argo, so that they can attend to the issue directly. They are required to log all incoming concerns for response and this record is also helpful during our auditing process (which is done regularly by ministry staff to make sure our contractors are fulfilling their obligations). Their contact information is listed below:

      Argo Road Maintenance (Thompson) Inc
      1 800 661-2025

      Website: argoroads.ca/service-areas/thompson
      Twitter: @Argo_Thompson
      Facebook: @ArgoRoads
      Instagram: @argoroads
      Email: argokam@argoroads.ca

      Reply